Typical Projects

Typical Projects

Typical Projects Map Map - Floating Dock Map - Dredging Map - Bulkhead Repair Map - Riprap Installation Map - Pier Map - Development Near Wetland

Agencies that review waterfront permits typically see a large number of applications for projects like bulkhead repairs, floating docks, and riprap to stabilize shorelines.

We’ve compiled summary information here about which permits you’ll need for these typical projects, as well as some project-specific resources.

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Bulkhead Repairs

Bulkheads are vertical retaining walls intended to hold soil in place, stabilizing a bank or shoreline. Replacements and repairs of bulkheads typically follow the existing grade and requirements of the original structure.

To conform to regulation, bulkhead repairs, when complete, should be “in-kind” and “in-place” – that is, the repair does not alter the size, shape, or placement of the structure. Preferably, there should be little or no extension waterward (towards the water) from the existing structure. If you cannot avoid waterward expansion, you must consider the effect on the aquatic environment.

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Bulkhead Repair Project Details

Permits You’ll Need

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps)

Permits needed

Army Corps generally allows the repair of existing, previously authorized, currently serviceable bulkheads under its Nationwide Permit #3 (“Maintenance”). A Nationwide Permit generally takes less time to process than a standard individual permit.

First steps

Applicants planning a bulkhead repair project should first submit a Joint Application to the Army Corps so that reviewers can determine: a) whether your project meets the Nationwide Permit thresholds, or b) whether an individual permit is required.

Learn more: Army Corps permitting

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC)

Permits needed

Some combination of the following NYS DEC permits are generally required for bulkhead repairs:

  • Tidal Wetlands or Freshwater Wetlands
  • Protection of Waters – Excavation & Fill in Navigable Waters
  • Section 401 – Clean Water Act – Water Quality Certification
  • Coastal Erosion Hazard Area – depending on location

Projects compatible with Standard Activity Permit (SAP) review

The easiest and most efficient path to obtaining a permit is the submission of an application for a project that is designed to be compatible with NYS DEC policies and land use regulations. NYS DEC has identified waterfront activities that conform to agency standards as Standard Activity Permits (SAPs). Bulkhead repair projects that involve and are limited to the removal of a lawfully existing, functional bulkhead and replacement with a similar structure in the exact location or landward of the former structure are compatible with agency (NYSDEC) policies and land use regulations, and are therefore classified for review as a Standard Activity Permit.

First steps:

  1. Obtain or update an existing site conditions map or property/site survey of the property. See NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Bulkhead Projects for recommended survey content.
  2. Check on the legal status of all existing shoreline structures and resolve outstanding issues/disputes.
  3. Prepare and submit a Joint Application with required NYS DEC materials. To find out what to include in the application, see NYS DEC’s Waterfront Activities Application Checklist. Note that application document and drawing requirements are the same for all bulkhead projects, regardless of SAP status.

Learn more: NYS DEC Permitting

New York State Department of State (NYS DOS)

Possible review

A NYS DOS Coastal Zone consistency review is required only if any one or more of the following are true:

  • The proposed repair of the bulkhead involves any waterward expansion (even if the expansion is less than 18 inches)
  • There is an increase in the footprint for the repair or replacement
  • There is any placement of in water fill
  • Placing fill behind the bulkhead does not warrant a DOS review

Learn more: Coastal Management Program

New York City Department of City Planning (NYC DCP)

Possible review

A NYC Waterfront Revitalization Program (WRP) consistency review is required only if a NYS DOS consistency review is also required (see above).

Learn more: NYC Waterfront Revitalization Program

Related Permits

Related Permits

Bulkhead repairs may require other permits, such as:

  • Waterfront Construction Permit – NYC Dept. of Small Business Services

For more information, see: Related Permits

Project-Specific Application Requirements

The following are some specific application requirements for construction and maintenance of bulkhead structures.

Project Description

If your bulkhead repair will result in any waterward expansion beyond the current limits of the existing structure, you must justify the purpose and need of the expansion. (Note that in this case, your project will be treated as a new shoreline stabilization project and may not qualify for the type of permits discussed above, such as a Nationwide Permit from Army Corps. It may also then require mitigation of unavoidable impacts to the environment, and an individual permit from the Army Corps.)

Guidelines on Drawing Information/Content for Bulkhead Projects

See NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Bulkhead Projects for a list of what to include on each drawing listed below:

  • Drawing Set Cover Sheet (recommended for projects with numerous drawings)
  • Site Location & Vicinity Map
  • Site Photos and Photo Location Map
  • Existing Site Conditions Map
  • Proposed Site/Project Plan
  • Cross Sections and Details

Agency Contacts

Army Corps

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NY District
Regulatory Branch, Room 1937
26 Federal Plaza
New York, NY 10278-0090

Phone: (917) 790-8511
Fax: (212) 264-4260

NYS DEC

Regional Permit Administrator
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Region 2
1 Hunter’s Point Plaza
47-40 21st Street
Long Island City, NY 11101-5401

Email: dep.r2@dec.ny.gov
Phone: (718) 482-4997
Fax: (718) 482-4975

NYS DOS

Consistency Review Unit
Office of Planning and Development
New York State Department of State
Suite 1010
99 Washington Avenue
One Commerce Place
Albany, NY 12231-0001

Email: cr@dos.ny.gov
Phone (518) 474-6000
Alternate: (518) 474-6572

NYC DCP

Michael Marrella
Director of Waterfront and Open Space
New York City Department of City Planning
120 Broadway, 31st Floor
New York, NY 10271

Email: wrp@planning.nyc.gov
Phone (212) 720-3626

Resources

Project Design

Guidelines for Design of Structures along NYS Coastlines
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
General guidelines

Protection Against Wave-based Erosion
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
A technical guide

Urban Waterfront Adaptive Strategies
New York City Department of City Planning
An in-depth study on alternative approaches to shoreline stabilization in New York City

Maintenance and Repairs

Extract: Tidal Wetlands Guidance Document Link
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Guidelines by the NYS DEC on functional waterfront structures, including precise definitions and alternatives to in-place replacement and repairs. See the section on “Replacement of Hard Shoreline Stabilization Structures”

 

 

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Development Near a Wetland

Construction projects in or near wetlands often adversely affect the environment in some way. Even renovation work near jurisdictional waters and/or wetlands can impact a fragile wetland ecosystem. Stormwater runoff is also a chief concern and cause of damage.

proj_wetland

If a project exceeds compatible land use regulations, applicants are required to examine alternative sites and project designs that avoid and reduce impacts to wetlands or develop plans to create or improve wetlands or wetland functions to compensate for unavoidable impacts to the environment.

Development Near a Wetland Project Details

Permits and Authorizations You’ll Need

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps)

Permits needed

An individual permit may be required. Nationwide Permits may apply to certain kinds of construction activities and structures. No review is required for renovation of buildings outside of wetlands.

First steps

Submit a Joint Application to the Army Corps so that reviewers can determine: a) whether your project meets the Nationwide Permit thresholds, or b) whether an individual permit is required.

Learn more: Army Corps permitting

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC)

Permits needed

Some combination of the following NYS DEC permits are generally required for building and development near wetlands:

  • Tidal Wetlands or Freshwater Wetlands
  • Protection of Waters – Excavation & Fill in Navigable Waters
  • Section 401 – Clean Water Act – Water Quality Certification
  • Coastal Erosion Hazard Area – (dependent on location)

Exempt

Private walkways are usually exempt from permitting

First Steps

  1. Does your property contain wetlands?
    Please see the links (below) on what to include and where to send a letter requesting a determination of whether or not a property contains a jurisdictional wetland:

    • Submit a letter with the street address and block and lot number of the property to: Region 2 (NYC) Environmental Permits: http://www.dec.ny.gov/permits/89000.html
    • For properties located within Breezy Point, include an aerial map showing the location of the lot.
  2.  Is your project location and scope within jurisdiction?
    The DEC may need to do a jurisdictional determination. Send the following to the NYS DEC Region 2:

    • Cover letter with project description
    • Joint Application Form
    • Permission to Inspect Property Form
    • Tax Map and/or Property Survey or Existing Conditions Map, if available.
    • Plans showing the proposed conceptual site design, project location within the property, limits of construction/disturbance including how they are accessing the site and storage of materials.
  3. Do you need a wetland boundary delineation?
    • Contact DEC to see if you need a wetland boundary delineation. DEC will coordinate with applicants/surveyors for a site visit to delineate wetland boundaries.
  4. Check on the legal status of all existing structures on the property, and resolve outstanding issues/disputes.
  5. Compatible projects design: The easiest and most efficient path to obtaining a permit is the submission of an application for a project that is designed to be compatible with agency (NYSDEC) policies and land use regulations. Note that adjacent area projects that do not comply with agency regulations, or where the scope is complex, may experience a longer review process, depending on the project scope, level of complexity and compliance with land use regulations.
  6. If your project is complex, DEC may coordinate a pre-application meeting with you and your project team. Be prepared to discuss project scope and bring concept plans.
  7. Submit a Joint Application with required NYS DEC materials. To find out what to include in your application, see the: DEC’s Waterfront Activities Application Checklist

Learn more: NYS DEC permitting

New York State Department of State (NYS DOS)

Review needed

A NYS DOS Coastal Zone consistency review is required for new construction of most structures. DOS reviews are not required for many projects which qualify as Nationwide Permits.

First steps

Contact the NYS DOS to discuss your project scope and requirements.

Learn more: NYS DOS Coastal Management Program 

New York City Department of City Planning (NYC DCP)

Review possible

A Waterfront Revitalization Program (WRP) consistency review may be required.

First steps

Contact the NYC DCP to discuss your project scope and requirements.

Learn more: NYC DCP Waterfront Revitalization Program

Related Permits

Your project may require need other NYC DEC permits:

  • SPDES (State Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) Permit
  • Stormwater Permit for Construction Activities
  • Water Withdrawals

Once the above agencies have approved your project, you’ll also need to obtain any necessary building and construction permits from NYC Department of Buildings.

For more information, see Related Permits

Project-Specific Application Requirements

The following are specific application requirements for development near a wetland.

Project Description

Your project description must explain why it is necessary to build in the chosen area, and include:

  • Proof that the construction of the riprap is not likely to cause any measurable increase in erosion at the development site or other location; and that it prevents or minimizes adverse effects to natural protective features, existing erosion protection structures, and natural resources such as significant fish and wildlife habitats
  • Include a descriptive narrative for complex projects, such as those involving more than one activity, where variances are involved, or for residential subdivisions. If your project exceeds compatible use actions and thresholds, NYS DEC will generally require mitigation of unavoidable impacts to the environment. For more about NYS DEC Land Use regulations, see:

Guidelines on Drawing Information/
Content for Development in Tidal Wetland Adjacent Areas

See DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Development in Tidal Wetland Adjacent Area for a list of what to include on each drawing listed below:

  • Drawing Set Cover Sheet (recommended for projects with numerous drawings)
  • Site Location & Vicinity Map
  • Site Photos and Photo Location Map
  • Existing Site Conditions Map
  • Proposed Site/Project Plan
  • Cross Sections and Details

Agency Contacts

Army Corps

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NY District
Regulatory Branch, Room 1937
26 Federal Plaza
New York, NY 10278-0090

Phone: (917) 790-8511
Fax: (212) 264-4260

NYS DEC

Regional Permit Administrator
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Region 2
1 Hunter’s Point Plaza
47-40 21st Street
Long Island City, NY 11101-5401

Email: dep.r2@dec.ny.gov
Phone: (718) 482-4997
Fax: (718) 482-4975

NYS DOS

Consistency Review Unit
Office of Planning and Development
New York State Department of State
Suite 1010
99 Washington Avenue
One Commerce Place
Albany, NY 12231-0001

Email: cr@dos.ny.gov
Phone (518) 474-6000
Alternate: (518) 474-6572

NYC DCP

Michael Marrella
Director of Waterfront and Open Space
New York City Department of City Planning
120 Broadway, 31st Floor
New York, NY 10271

Email: wrp@planning.nyc.gov
Phone (212) 720-3626

Resources

Land Use Regulations near Wetlands

Procedural requirements for specific types of activities near wetlands are listed on the following website pages on Westlaw:

Stormwater Management

New York State Stormwater Management Design Manual
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Technical manual for engineers, designers, and other professionals

Conserving Natural Areas and Wildlife in Your Community: Smart Growth Strategies for Protecting the Biological Diversity of New York’s Hudson River Valley
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Chapter 10: Stormwater Management for People and Wildlife includes introductory techniques for stormwater management

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Dredging

Dredging projects are located either in open waters or along shoreline areas, with a scope that ranges from simple, generally open water projects, to more complex, large open water or shoreline projects, with proposed upland deposition or disposal sites.

proj_dredge

As dredging has the potential to adversely affect the environment in some way, dredging projects must be designed to protect natural resources and habitats during the dredge process. Applicants are required to examine alternative sites and project designs that avoid and reduce impacts to wetlands from dredging, and should develop plans to create or improve wetlands, wetland functions, and aquatic resources to compensate for unavoidable impacts to the environment.

 

Dredging Project Details

Permits and Authorizations You’ll Need

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps)

Permits needed

An individual permit may be required. Nationwide Permits may apply to dredging projects of 25 cubic yards or less, provided that they do not impact certain kinds of aquatic resources and ecosystems.

First steps

Submit a Joint Application to the Army Corps so that reviewers can determine: a) whether your project meets the Nationwide Permit thresholds, or b) whether an individual permit is required.

Learn more: Army Corps permitting

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC)

Permits needed

Some combination of the following NYS DEC permits are generally required for dredging projects:

  • Tidal Wetlands
  • Protection of Waters – Excavation & Fill in Navigable Waters
  • Section 401 – Clean Water Act – Water Quality Certification
  • Coastal Erosion Hazard Area – depending on location

First steps:

  1. Typical open water and shoreline dredge projects, with removals greater than 100 cubic yards, should follow the guidelines outlined below. However, occasional small dredge/excavation projects with removal volumes of less than 100 cubic yards have different submission. Contact the NYS DEC to discuss your proposed dredging project, and to clarify specific project requirements.
  2. Submit a Sediment Sampling and Analysis Plan.
    • For plan design guidance, see Designing a Dredging Sediment Sampling and Analysis Plan and the “TOGS 5.1.9 In-Water and Riparian Management of Sediment and Dredged Material” document found on that Web page.
    • Submitted sampling plans will be reviewed by NYS DEC for additional guidance and approval.
    • Complete the sediment sampling per the DEC-approved plan and submit results to DEC as part of the Joint Application.

Learn more: NYS DEC permitting

New York State Department of State (NYS DOS)

Review needed

A NYS DOS Coastal Zone consistency review is required for dredging projects over 25 cubic yards. Currently, DOS reviews are not required for minor dredging projects which qualify as Army Corps Nationwide Permits. Keep in mind, however, that Nationwide Permits can change every five years.

First steps

Contact the NYS DOS to clarify your project scope and requirements, and to learn whether you need to apply for a review.

Learn more: NYS DOS Coastal Management Program

New York City Department of City Planning (NYC DCP)

Review possible

A Waterfront Revitalization Program (WRP) consistency review may be required.

First steps

Contact the NYC DCP to discuss your project scope and requirements, and to learn whether you need a WRP review.

Learn more: NYC DCP Waterfront Revitalization Program

Related Permits

Dredging projects may require other permits, such as:

  • Waterfront Construction Work Permit – NYC Dept. of Small Business Services

For more information, see Related Permits

Project-Specific Application Requirements

The following are specific application requirements for typical dredge projects.

Project Description

Your description for a dredging project should include:

  • Location and general description of the area to be dredged.
  • Type(s) and volume(s) of dredge material.
  • Proposed depth of dredge and overdredge at Mean Low Water (MLW).
  • The method of dredging/excavation (for example, hydraulic dredging, clam shell bucket, environmental bucket, etc.).
  • If the proposed dredging operations will include dewatering, describe the dewatering methodology.
  • The location of an upland deposition or disposal site, if dredged material is to be transported there.
  • Proposed dredging schedule.
  • The potential effects on the tidal bay area, if dredging for inlet management of tidal bays.

Documents to Include 

  • Joint Application Form
  • Test results from the approved Sediment Sampling Plan in a spreadsheet format, and in conformance with TOGS 5.1.9 In-Water and Riparian Management of Sediment and Dredged Material
  • Where the dredged material is proposed for use on an upland beneficial use project in the state of New York, the applicant must submit a Beneficial Use Determination (BUD) – see Checklist for BUD Submissions
  • Where a project involves the proposed use of dredge material for beach placement or use on a restoration project site that has not yet been permitted, provide supplemental drawing information as applicable per NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Development in Tidal Wetland Adjacent Areas
  • For land deposition on property not owned by the applicant, provide a signed letter of acceptance from the property owner.
  • For disposal or placement of dredged material at a landfill, brownfield or previously approved restoration project site, provide a signed letter of acceptance from the receiving facility.

Guidelines on Drawing Information/Content for Dredging Projects

See NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Dredging Projects for a list of what to include on each drawing listed below:

  • Site Location Map
  • Site Photos and Photo Location Map
  • Bathymetric Survey and Proposed Dredge Plan

Agency Contacts

Army Corps

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NY District
Regulatory Branch, Room 1937
26 Federal Plaza
New York, NY 10278-0090

Phone: (917) 790-8511
Fax: (212) 264-4260

NYS DEC

Regional Permit Administrator
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Region 2
1 Hunter’s Point Plaza
47-40 21st Street
Long Island City, NY 11101-5401

Email: dep.r2@dec.ny.gov
Phone: (718) 482-4997
Fax: (718) 482-4975

NYS DOS

Consistency Review Unit
Office of Planning and Development
New York State Department of State
Suite 1010
99 Washington Avenue
One Commerce Place
Albany, NY 12231-0001

Email: cr@dos.ny.gov
Phone (518) 474-6000
Alternate: (518) 474-6572

NYC DCP

Michael Marrella
Director of Waterfront and Open Space
New York City Department of City Planning
120 Broadway, 31st Floor
New York, NY 10271

Email: wrp@planning.nyc.gov
Phone (212) 720-3626


Resources
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Floating Dock

The size and use of a floating dock will determine your application requirements for obtaining a waterfront permit.

proj_floating

The permitting of small residential floating docks can be expedited by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation through a Standard Activity Permit, provided the dock meets size restrictions. Any floating dock designed for the mooring of boats must be located in a minimum water depth sufficient to support boating and must meet strict design standards and survey requirements.

Floating Dock Project Details

Permits You’ll Need

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps)

Permits needed

An individual permit is required

First steps

Submit a Joint Application with required Army Corps materials

Learn more: Army Corps permitting

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC)

Permits needed

Some combination of the following NYS DEC permits are generally required for floating dock projects:

  • Tidal Wetlands or Freshwater Wetlands
  • Protection of Waters – Excavation & Fill in Navigable Waters
  • Section 401 – Clean Water Act – Water Quality Certification
  • Coastal Erosion Hazard Area – depending on location

Projects compatible with Standard Activity Permit (SAP) review:

The easiest and most efficient path to obtaining a permit is the submission of an application for a project that is designed to be compatible with NYS DEC policies and land use regulations. NYS DEC has identified waterfront activities that conform to agency standards as Standard Activity Permits (SAPs). Residential floating dock(s) totaling 200 square feet or less in size, including associated pilings are compatible with agency (NYSDEC) policies and land use regulations, and are therefore classified for review as a Standard Activity Permit.

First steps

  1. Obtain or update an existing site conditions map or property/site survey of the property. See NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Dock Projects for recommended survey content.
  2. Check on the legal status of all existing shoreline structures and resolve outstanding issues/disputes.
  3. Submit a Joint Application with required NYS DEC materials. To find out what to include in the application, see DEC’s Waterfront Activities Application Checklist. If you believe you qualify for a Standard Activity Permit, include a cover letter with your application stating so. Note that application document and drawing requirements are the same for all dock projects, regardless of SAP status.

Learn more: NYS DEC permitting

New York State Department of State (NYS DOS)

Review needed

A NYS DOS Coastal Zone consistency review is required for a new floating dock

First steps

Submit a Joint Application with required NYS DOS materials

Learn more: NYS DOS Coastal Management Program

New York State Department of State (NYS DOS)

Review needed

A Waterfront Revitalization Program (WRP) consistency review is required for a new floating dock

First steps

Submit a Joint Application with required NYC DCP materials

Learn more: NYC DCP Waterfront Revitalization Program

Related Permits

Floating dock projects may require other permits, such as:

  • Floating Objects – NYS Office of Parks Recreation and Historic Preservation
  • Waterfront Construction Work Permit – NYC Dept. of Small Business Services

For more information, see: Related Permits

Project-Specific Requirements

Overall Project Requirements

  • If there is a possibility that a float could sit on the bottom of the waterway, the structure should be chocked at a minimum of 18 inches.
  • Any docks/piers/catwalks that pass through a vegetated wetland to access a float should be constructed at an elevation of 4.5 feet over grade.
  • Any docks extending into navigable waters should not extend beyond 25% of the width of the waterway (including the width/length of boats moored at the structure) to allow for safe navigation.]
  • Floating docks where boats are moored must be located in a minimum water depth of -2.5 feet at Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW). It’s essential that you accurately determine water depth at your proposed site.
    • All depths must be certified and prepared by a NYS licensed Land Survey using either a standard bathymetric survey method, or measurements taken at Mean Low Low Water with a sounding pole or survey rod.

Project Description

Your project description must explain why it is necessary to build in the chosen area, and include:

  • A long-term maintenance program
  • Proof that the construction of the dock is not likely to cause any measurable increase in erosion at the development site or other location; and that it prevents or minimizes adverse effects to natural protective features, existing erosion protection structures, and natural resources such as significant fish and wildlife habitats.

Guidelines on Drawing Information/Content for Dock Projects

See NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Docks for a list of what to include on each drawing listed below:

  • Drawing Set Cover Sheet (recommended for projects with numerous drawings)
  • Site Location & Vicinity Map
  • Site Photos and Photo Location Map
  • Existing Site Conditions Map
  • Proposed Site/Project Plan
  • Cross Sections and Details

Supplement Form for Larger Dock Projects

A Dock Application Supplement Form D-2 is required by the NYS DEC for:

  • Floating dockage of more than five boats
  • Facility perimeter over 4,000 square feet

Agency Contacts

Army Corps

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NY District
Regulatory Branch, Room 1937
26 Federal Plaza
New York, NY 10278-0090

Phone: (917) 790-8511
Fax: (212) 264-4260

NYS DEC

Regional Permit Administrator
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Region 2
1 Hunter’s Point Plaza
47-40 21st Street
Long Island City, NY 11101-5401

Email: dep.r2@dec.ny.gov
Phone: (718) 482-4997
Fax: (718) 482-4975

NYS DOS

Consistency Review Unit
Office of Planning and Development
New York State Department of State
Suite 1010
99 Washington Avenue
One Commerce Place
Albany, NY 12231-0001

Email: cr@dos.ny.gov
Phone (518) 474-6000
Alternate: (518) 474-6572

NYC DCP

Michael Marrella
Director of Waterfront and Open Space
New York City Department of City Planning
120 Broadway, 31st Floor
New York, NY 10271

Email: wrp@planning.nyc.gov
Phone (212) 720-3626

Resources

Extract:

Tidal Wetlands Guidance Document: Residential Catwalks and Docks
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Permitting guidance on standards for residential docks, including floating docks

 

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Piers

Piers are a standard feature on urban waterfronts, providing access to boats and recreational and commercial maritime activities. But from an environmental perspective, there is evidence that piers and docks reduce light penetration, alter patterns of water flow, and negatively impact marine life.

proj_pier2

The permitting of small residential piers meeting certain requirements can be expedited through the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation through a Standard Activity Permit. Application requirements for construction of piers for boat docking are provided in this section.

Piers Project Details

Permits You’ll Need

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps)

Permits needed

An individual permit is required

First steps

Submit a Joint Application with required Army Corps materials

Learn more: Army Corps permitting

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC)

Permits needed

Some combination of the following NYS DEC permits are generally required for pier construction projects:

  • Tidal Wetlands or Freshwater Wetlands
  • Protection of Waters – Excavation & Fill in Navigable Waters
  • Section 401 – Clean Water Act – Water Quality Certification
  • Coastal Erosion Hazard Area – depending on location

Projects compatible with Standard Activity Permit (SAP) review:

The easiest and most efficient path to obtaining a permit is the submission of an application for a project that is designed to be compatible with NYS DEC policies and land use regulations. NYS DEC has identified waterfront activities that conform to agency standards as Standard Activity Permits (SAPs). Residential pier projects where the scope is limited to an open pile catwalk or pier up to 50 feet in length and no more than 4 feet wide are compatible with agency (NYSDEC) policies and land use regulations, and are therefore classified for review as a Standard Activity Permit.

First steps:

  1. Obtain or update an existing site conditions map or property/site survey of the property. See NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Pier Projects for recommended survey content.
  2. Check on the legal status of all existing shoreline structures and resolve outstanding issues/disputes.
  3. Submit a Joint Application with required NYS DEC materials. To find out what to include in the application, see DEC’s Waterfront Activities Application Checklist. If you believe you qualify for a Standard Activity Permit, include a cover letter with your application stating so. Note that application document and drawing requirements are the same for all pier projects, regardless of SAP status.

Learn more: NYS DEC permitting

New York State Department of State (NYS DOS)

Review needed

A NYS DOS federal consistency review is required for new pier construction

First steps

Submit a Joint Application with required NYS DOS materials

Learn more: NYS DOS Coastal Management Program

New York City Department of City Planning (NYC DCP)

Review needed

A Waterfront Revitalization Program (WRP) consistency review is required for new pier construction

First steps

Submit a Joint Application with required NYC DCP materials

Learn more: NYC DCP Waterfront Revitalization Program

Related Permits

Related Permits

Pier projects may require other permits, such as:

  • Waterfront Construction Work Permit – NYC Dept. of Small Business Services

For more information, see Related Permits

Project-Specific Requirements

Overall Project Guidelines

  • Any docks/piers/catwalks that pass through a vegetated wetland to access a float should be constructed at an elevation of 4.5 feet over grade.
  • Any docks extending into navigable waters should not extend beyond 25% of the width of the waterway (including the width/length of boats moored at the structure) to allow for safe navigation.]
  • Fixed structures and piers where boats are moored should be located in a minimum water depth of -2.5 feet at Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW). It’s essential that you accurately determine water depth at your proposed site.
    • All depths must be certified and prepared by a NYS licensed Land Survey using either a standard bathymetric survey method, or measurements taken at MLLW with a sounding pole or survey rod.

Project Description

Your project description must explain why it is necessary to build in the chosen area, and include:

  • A long-term maintenance program
  • Proof that the construction of the pier/dock is not likely to cause any measurable increase in erosion at the development site or other location; and that it prevents or minimizes adverse effects to natural protective features, existing erosion protection structures, and natural resources such as significant fish and wildlife habitats.

Guidelines on Drawing Information/Content for Pier Projects

NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Piers (Dock) Projects for a list of what to include on each drawing listed below:

  • Drawing Set Cover Sheet (recommended for projects with numerous drawings)
  • Site Location & Vicinity Map
  • Site Photos and Photo Location Map
  • Existing Site Conditions Map
  • Proposed Site/Project Plan
  • Cross Sections and Details

Supplement Form for Larger Pier Projects

A Dock Application Supplement Form D-2 is required by DEC for:

  • Floating dockage of more than five boats
  • Facility perimeter over 4,000 square feet

Agency Contacts

Army Corps

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NY District
Regulatory Branch, Room 1937
26 Federal Plaza
New York, NY 10278-0090

Phone: (917) 790-8511
Fax: (212) 264-4260

NYS DEC

Regional Permit Administrator
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Region 2
1 Hunter’s Point Plaza
47-40 21st Street
Long Island City, NY 11101-5401

Email: dep.r2@dec.ny.gov
Phone: (718) 482-4997
Fax: (718) 482-4975

NYS DOS

Consistency Review Unit
Office of Planning and Development
New York State Department of State
Suite 1010
99 Washington Avenue
One Commerce Place
Albany, NY 12231-0001

Email: cr@dos.ny.gov
Phone (518) 474-6000
Alternate: (518) 474-6572

NYC DCP

Michael Marrella
Director of Waterfront and Open Space
New York City Department of City Planning
120 Broadway, 31st Floor
New York, NY 10271

Email: wrp@planning.nyc.gov
Phone (212) 720-3626

Resources

Extract:
Tidal Wetlands Guidance Document: Residential Catwalks and Docks
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Permitting guidance on standards for residential open pile catwalks and docks

Close Project

Riprap Installation

Riprap, also known as “stone revetments,” is loose stone or rock used to protect shorelines from erosion. The stones absorb some of the energy of turbulent, moving water, minimizing the effects of erosion. A riprap installation can be both cost-effective and more environmentally-sensitive than bulkheads or retaining walls.

proj_riprap

Riprap Installation Project Details

Permits and Authorizations You’ll Need

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps)

Permits needed

If your riprap installation does not exceed 500 feet in length and does not exceed one cubic yard per running foot, it may be eligible for authorization under the Army Corps Nationwide Permit #13 (“Bank Stabilization”). A Nationwide Permit generally takes less time to process than a standard individual permit.

First steps

Regardless of project scope, applicants planning a new riprap project should first submit a Joint Application to the Army Corps so that reviewers can determine: a) whether your project meets the Nationwide Permit thresholds, or b) whether an individual permit is required.

Learn more: Army Corps permitting

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC)

Permits needed

Some combination of the following NYS DEC permits are generally required for riprap projects:

  • Tidal Wetlands or Freshwater Wetlands
  • Protection of Waters – Excavation & Fill in Navigable Waters
  • Section 401 – Clean Water Act – Water Quality Certification
  • Coastal Erosion Hazard Area – depending on location

First steps

  1. Obtain or update an existing site conditions map or property/site survey of the property. See NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Riprap Revetment Projects for recommended survey content.
  2. Check on the legal status of all existing shoreline structures and resolve outstanding issues/disputes.
  3. Prepare and submit a Joint Application with required NYS DEC materials. To find out what to include in the application, see NYS DEC’s Waterfront Activities Application Checklist. Note that application document and drawing requirements are the same for all riprap projects, regardless of whether it is a new installation or a repair.
  4. If your riprap installation is part of a more complex project with other structural components, DEC recommends you contact them to discuss your project scope.

Learn more: NYS DEC permitting

New York State Department of State (NYS DOS)

Review needed

A NYS DOS Coastal Zone consistency review is required for a new riprap installation

First steps

Submit a Joint Application with required NYS DOS materials

Learn more: NYS DOS Coastal Management Program

New York City Department of City Planning (NYC DCP)

Review needed

A Waterfront Revitalization Program (WRP) consistency review is required for a new riprap installation.

First steps

A copy of the permit application materials, as well as a consistency assessment for the WRP policies, should be sent to the NYC DCP.

Learn more: NYC DCP Waterfront Revitalization Program

Related Permits

Riprap installation projects may require other permits, such as:

  • Waterfront Construction Work Permit – NYC Dept. of Small Business Services

For more information, see: Related Permits

Project-Specific Application Requirements

The following are specific application requirements for new riprap projects.

Project Description

Your project description must explain why it is necessary to build in the chosen area, and include:

  • Proof that the protective measures of the riprap installation have a reasonable probability of controlling erosion on the immediate site for at least 30 years
  • A long-term maintenance program
  • Proof that the construction of the riprap is not likely to cause any measurable increase in erosion at the development site or other location; and that it prevents or minimizes adverse effects to natural protective features, existing erosion protection structures, and natural resources such as significant fish and wildlife habitats.

Supporting documentation for your application must also include:

  • Historic and current erosion rates on the property
  • Historic and current photography
  • Historic and current surveys or site plans

Guidelines on Drawing Information/Content for Riprap Projects

See NYS DEC’s Drawing Checklist for Riprap Revetment Projects for a list of what to include on each drawing listed below:

  • Drawing Set Cover Sheet (recommended for projects with numerous drawings)
  • Site Location & Vicinity Map
  • Site Photos and Photo Location Map
  • Existing Site Conditions Map
  • Proposed Site/Project Plan
  • Cross Sections and Details

Agency Contacts

Army Corps

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NY District
Regulatory Branch, Room 1937
26 Federal Plaza
New York, NY 10278-0090

Phone: (917) 790-8511
Fax: (212) 264-4260

NYS DEC

Regional Permit Administrator
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Region 2
1 Hunter’s Point Plaza
47-40 21st Street
Long Island City, NY 11101-5401

Email: dep.r2@dec.ny.gov
Phone: (718) 482-4997
Fax: (718) 482-4975

NYS DOS

Consistency Review Unit
Office of Planning and Development
New York State Department of State
Suite 1010
99 Washington Avenue
One Commerce Place
Albany, NY 12231-0001

Email: cr@dos.ny.gov
Phone (518) 474-6000
Alternate: (518) 474-6572

NYC DCP

Michael Marrella
Director of Waterfront and Open Space
New York City Department of City Planning
120 Broadway, 31st Floor
New York, NY 10271

Email: wrp@planning.nyc.gov
Phone (212) 720-3626

Resources

Project Design

Guidelines for Design of Structures along NYS Coastlines
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
General guidelines

Protection against Wave-based Erosion
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
A technical guide

Urban Waterfront Adaptive Strategies
New York City Department of City Planning
An in-depth study on alternative approaches to shoreline stabilization in New York City